Updates

Appearing on NPR Here and Now: Coronavirus and Grief

Every day, people are dying from COVID-19. They are our family members, our friends, our neighbors and community members. For most, there will be no traditional wakes, funerals, memorials, burials or church ceremonies to help us process our emotions. So how do we begin to grieve and make sense of this new reality? Host Tonya Mosley talks with Brandy Schillace (@bschillace), EIC of BMJ Medical Humanities and author of “Death’s Summer Coat: What the History of Death and Dying Teaches Us About Life and Living.”  

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Interviewed by Jodi Kantor, New York Times

‘We’re Going to See What Else the Word Funeral Can Mean’ — As the coronavirus pandemic limits people’s ability to mourn, they are finding new ways to say goodbye. I was honored to be among those interviewed for Jodi Kantor’s latest in NYT Dilemmas. This series takes a long hard look at the crisis many are facing in the face of #Coronavirus.

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Essay at the Globe and Mail: Grief and COVID19

Grief in the time of coronavirus: How will the way we mourn change? Read this article at @globeandmail! Ashes to ashes, adjust adjust: The ancient, deeply human instinct to physically gather in times of death has now run up against social-distancing practices. But COVID-19 might just serve as an opportunity to make the ways we grieve better. As concern over the pandemic of COVID-19 increases, religious institutions and funeral homes have been ordered to halt gatherings for the purpose of “social distancing,” a means of limiting the person-to-person spread of contagion. [READ MORE]

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Recent Essay in @SciAm:

The Surprisingly Old Science of Living as Transgender: In the 20th century’s middle decades, the first recipient of phalloplasty surgery fought to be recognized as a man. See my essay at VOICES/Opinions, Scientific American @Sciam: In early March of 1958, Michael Dillon, ship’s surgeon, made his way below deck. A member of the United Kingdom’s Merchant Navy, possessed of athletic bearing and a luxuriant beard, Dillon had hardly opened his sick bay when the steward delivered a cable. “Do you intend to claim the title since your change-over?” it read. “Kindly cable the Daily Express.” Dillon blanched and crushed the letter in his palms, then lit his pipe with shaking hands. He had kept a secret for over 15 years: Dillon had been born Laura Maud (sometimes written as “Maude”) Dillon. [Read More]

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