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Spooky Action

Spooky Action

Where does all this “spooky” business come from? It sounds father Gothic, but it hails from a famous debate between Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr. Bohr’s theory–which I am not remotely qualified to explain, though I will try–suggested that: 1) two particles could become interrelated or entangled and 2) after which, they could interact even at astronomical distances, without any visible connection. (Bear with me, I’m going somewhere with this.)

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Kindergarten Blues, or “I don’t live in a greenhouse”

Kindergarten Blues, or “I don’t live in a greenhouse”

I was, perhaps, an odd sort of child. I was not terribly well socialized for one thing, unless you consider sitting on the back of another toddler in the sand box and beating her with a spoon a kind of business networking. I also bit a child’s finger when she stuck it through the fence of my yard (that will teach you). Not surprisingly, I am the only person I’ve ever met who was kicked out of pre-school and asked not to return. Don’t get the wrong idea, though. I was less raving monster and more Wednesday Addams. And one of the best examples of this comes from my first day of kindergarten.

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A Horror of Nothing

A Horror of Nothing

How dismal it is to have nothing to do–nothing to wish for–or, as Dr. Johnson put it in Rassalas, nothing to desire. It is a far worse fate than oceans of dread, tides of embarrassment, fits of rage, years of longing. For all of these have an object, something out in front of (or dreadfully behind) the fearful, fretting human soul.

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HuffPo: Troubling the Future

HuffPo: Troubling the Future

TROUBLING THE FUTURE: the Remaking of Nikola Tesla: There are two great myths about Nikola Tesla. The first is that his greatest rival was Thomas Edison. But the second is perhaps even more intriguing. Read more at the HuffPo!

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Ghosts in the Machine?

Ghosts in the Machine?

I happen to be fond of ghosts. Not the sort that show up at seances, but more the kind you find in texts like Turn of the Screw. That is, not "ghost" as in white sheets and hauntings, but "ghost" as in the unexplained element--the "ghost" in the machine. What exactly...

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#2018Medhums: Social Justice in Medicine

#2018Medhums: Social Justice in Medicine

Medical humanities is a means of reflection upon and examination of biomedicine in context—and a recognition that context is politicized, culturally complex, and frequently ambiguous. But to see such a broad a vista needs a broad approach. My aim isn’t to define the medicine humanities as a single, static instrument or lens. Instead, we want to reconsider the medical humanities as radical dialogic encounter—a place for conversation with those outside our own areas of specialty.

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What Does it Mean to Write?

What Does it Mean to Write?

I probably should have called this ‘what does it mean to write for publication if you are Brandy Lain Schillace.’ (But that would be a very long title.) I am about to get a little bit personal about the writing life today, and to talk about something that doesn’t get a lot of air time. Being a professional writer, for better or worse, requires the author to do a lot of things that have nothing to do with the actual written word. It’s about publicizing, and social media, and making appearances, and doing the legwork, and being a graphic artist, and maybe a web designer, too. And for many, it means holding down a separate job (or three), and sorting out how to make the disparate pieces connect. It’s hard, and pretty un-sexy, too, at times. So: How’s it done and why?

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For the History Buff on your list…

For the History Buff on your list…

Confession: I have a tendency to use the “gift book” get out of jail free card quite a lot. It beats fruit cake. And the truth is, today’s online-searchable world opens up a buffet line of keywords to help you with complex family members. Aunt who loves dogs and knitting and Halloween? Yes. There is a book for that. Uncle with a passion for do-it-yourself and cheap wine? A book for that, too, as it happens. But maybe you have that most-feared of all acquaintances, the HISTORY BUFF. You know the sort: the one who stands up at the back of every single holiday movie to remind you that ‘it did not happen that way’–the one who corrects your anachronistic jokes, the one who wants to tell you how it USED to be. I know that type because, well, I am one. (TESLA DID NOT SAY THAT, she shouts at the television. Again.)

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Review by David Pitt, Booklist Online

Review by David Pitt, Booklist Online

“Schillace’s ambitious study of the history of steampunk is sure to appeal to a wide range of readers, from SF fans to readers of Victorian history (much of steampunk is set during the Victorian Era)…”

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